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3D bioprinting methods ‘less clinically relevant'

Developments in 3D bioprinting technologies are predicted to shape the future of the medical world and the way in which drugs and medication are tested, however a new report predicts this technology would be better served in a different direction.

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3D bioprinting is claimed to be key to the drug development process

Despite breakthroughs with 3D printing organs and tissue looking set to transform the way we research and treat medical cases, ‘3D bioprinting 2018 – 2028: Technologies, Markets, Forecasts’ by IDTechEx claims that due to the small size of the tissue currently 3D bioprinted, these methods are “less clinically relevant”.

However, the report outlines how these tissue structures can still be used in research through the testing of chemicals for human use.

The report reads: “Testing drugs on 3D bioprinted organs has the potential to optimise and accelerate the drug development process. The greatest impact will be in eliminating toxic drugs more quickly so that they do not make it to the costly clinical trial process. This way, resources can be focused on more promising opportunities, and human volunteers will be exposed to lowered risks.

For now, we are optimistic that 3D bioprinted organ models will lead researchers to a better understanding of human biology and disease, which will lead us to better therapeutics

Reflecting on current technologies and the potential for these in the future, the report concludes: “There is still a way to go in developing 3D bioprinting technologies before they are ready to create 3D bioprinted organs for transplant.”

Whilst IDTechEx credits the progress 3D bioprinting has made so far, it does not predict the regenerative medicine market will contribute “substantially” to the overall value provided by 3D bioprinting by 2028.

“For now, we are optimistic that 3D bioprinted organ models will lead researchers to a better understanding of human biology and disease, which will lead us to better therapeutics,” the report concludes.

If you have any news, please email carys@linkpublishing.co.uk or join in with the conversation on Twitter and LinkedIn.


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