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Industry

Unlawful magazine firm shut down

A company which falsely claimed to publish magazines in support of emergency services has been wound up in court after a petition was presented.

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The company claimed to distribute magazines to emergency services

The Hannay Partnership has been described as using “unscrupulous behaviour” to trick companies into paying up to £7,500 a week in advertising.

During a hearing on August 2nd 2019, the court heard how the company, which was founded in March 2013, claimed to publish three quarterly magazines titled: To the Rescue, Survivor, and On Call.

Employees would unlawfully target advertisers through cold calling, where they would misrepresent print runs and circulations of the magazines, claim that the proceeds were used to benefit the emergency services and even pretend to be members of the emergency services themselves.

The petition was presented under s124A of the Insolvency Act 1986 on May 3rd, 2019 by the Insolvency Service on behalf of the Secretary for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

When the company came under scrutiny, it claimed to produce a total of 6,000 magazines each year, which were presented to the various emergency services free-of-charge.

The Hannay Partnership manipulated the national goodwill towards our emergency services, using deliberately misleading practices to secure revenue that was then not used for the advertised purposes

An investigation by Insolvency Service however found that the company only printed a total of 200 magazines last year, none of which were distributed, nor any financial contribution made to benefit the services.

“The Hannay Partnership manipulated the national goodwill towards our emergency services, using deliberately misleading practices to secure revenue that was then not used for the advertised purposes,” comments Scott Crighton, chief investigator for the Insolvency Service.

“We welcome the court’s decision to wind up the Hannay Partnership in the public interest, stopping this unscrupulous behaviour in its tracks and ensuring that businesses and individuals that choose to contribute financially to our emergency services can do so in confidence that their donations will be passed on,” Crighton adds.

Company Investigations – a branch of the Insolvency Service – uses powers under the Companies Act 1985 to conduct confidential investigations into UK companies.

At the time of writing, The Hannay Partnership is listed on Companies House as an active publisher of consumer and business journals and periodicals.

If you have any news, please email carys@linkpublishing.co.uk or join in with the conversation on Twitter and LinkedIn.


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